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THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE X-RAY COUNTERPART TO PSR J2021+4026

Alberto Carramiñana Alonso (2011)

We report the probable identification of the X-ray counterpart to the γ -ray pulsar PSR J2021+4026 using imaging with the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and timing analysis with the Fermi satellite. Given the statistical and systematic errors, the positions determined by both satellites are coincident. The X-ray source position is R.A. 20 ͪ 21 ͫ 30ˢ.733, decl. + 40◦26’46“.04 (J2000) with an estimated uncertainty of 1“.3 combined statistical and systematic error. Moreover, both the X-ray to γ -ray and the X-ray to optical flux ratios are sensible assuming a neutron star origin for the X-ray flux. The X-ray source has no cataloged infrared-to-visible counterpart and, through new observations, we set upper limits to its optical emission of i’ > 23.0 mag and r’ > 25.2 mag. The source exhibits an X-ray spectrum with most likely both a power law and a thermal component. We also report on the X-ray and visible light properties of the 43 other sources detected in our Chandra observation.

Article

Pulsars: individual (PSR J2021+4026) Supernovae: individual (SNR 78.2+2.1) X-rays: general CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Unveiling the nature of INTEGRAL objects through optical spectroscopy*. VII. Identification of 20 galactic and extragalactic hard X-ray sources

VAHRAM CHAVUSHYAN (2009)

Within the framework of our program of assessment of the nature of unidentified or poorly known INTEGRAL sources, we present here spectroscopy of optical objects, selected through positional cross-correlation with soft X-ray detections (afforded with satellites such as Swift, ROSAT, Chandra and/or XMM-Newton) as putative counterparts of hard X-ray sources detected with the IBIS instrument onboard INTEGRAL. Using 6 telescopes of various sizes and archival data from two on-line spectroscopic surveys we are able to identify, either for the first time or independent of other groups, the nature of 20 INTEGRAL hard X-ray sources. Our results indicate that: 11 of these objects are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts between 0.014 and 0.978, 7 of which display broad emission lines, 2 show narrow emission lines only, and 2 have unremarkable or no emission lines (thus are likely Compton thick AGNs); 5 are cataclysmic variables (CVs), 4 of which are (possibly magnetic) dwarf novae and one is a symbiotic star; and 4 are Galactic X-ray binaries (3 with high-mass companions and one with a low-mass secondary). It is thus again found that the majority of these sources are AGNs or magnetic CVs, confirming our previous findings. When possible, the main physical parameters for these hard X-ray sources are also computed using the multiwavelength information available in the literature. These identifications support the importance of INTEGRAL in the study of the hard X-ray spectrum of all classes of X-ray emitting objects, and the effectiveness of a strategy of multi-catalogue cross-correlation plus optical spectroscopy to securely pinpoint the actual nature of unidentified hard X-ray sources.

Article

Galaxies: Seyfert Quasars: emission lines X-rays: binaries Stars: novae, cataclysmic variables Techniques: spectroscopic X-rays: general CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Unveiling the nature of INTEGRAL objects through optical spectroscopy ⋆ : IX. Twenty two more identifications, and a glance into the far hard X-ray Universe

Vahram Chavushyan (2012)

Since its launch in October 2002, the INTEGRAL satellite has revolutionized our knowledge of the hard X-ray sky thanks to its unprecedented imaging capabilities and source detection positional accuracy above 20 keV. Nevertheless, many of the newly-detected sources in the INTEGRAL sky surveys are of unknown nature. The combined use of available information at longer wavelengths (mainly soft X-rays and radio) and of optical spectroscopy on the putative counterparts of these new hard X-ray objects allows us to pinpoint their exact nature. Continuing our long-standing program that has been running since 2004, and using 6 different telescopes of various sizes together with data from an online spectroscopic survey, here we report the classification through optical spectroscopy of 22 more unidentified or poorly studied high-energy sources detected with the IBIS instrument onboard INTEGRAL.We found that 16 of them are active galactic nuclei (AGNs), while the remaining 6 objects are within our Galaxy. Among the identified extragalactic sources, the large majority (14) is made up of type 1 AGNs (i.e. with broad emission lines); of these, 6 lie at redshift larger than 0.5 and one (IGR J12319−0749) has z = 3.12, which makes it the second farthest object detected in the INTEGRAL surveys up to now. The remaining AGNs are of type 2 (that is, with narrow emission lines only), and one of the two cases is confirmed as a pair of interacting Seyfert 2 galaxies. The Galactic objects are identified as two cataclysmic variables, one high-mass X-ray binary, one symbiotic binary and two chromospherically active stars, possibly of RS CVn type. The main physical parameters of these hard X-ray sources were also determined using the multiwavelength information available in the literature. We thus still find that AGNs are the most abundant population among hard X-ray objects identified through optical spectroscopy. Moreover, we note that the higher sensitivity of the more recent INTEGRAL surveys is now enabling the detection of high-redshift AGNs, thus allowing the exploration of the most distant hard X-ray emitting sources and possibly of the most extreme blazars.

Article

X-rays: binaries Galaxies: Seyfert X-rays: general Novae, cataclysmic variables Quasars: emission lines Stars: flare CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Formation of copper-based particles trapped in a silica xerogel matrix

JOSE ANDRES MATUTES AQUINO (2000)

Using IR absorption and X-Ray diffraction we have analyzed the incorporation of Cu-based aggregates in a SiO2 matrix

in samples prepared by the sol-gel method. We doped the silica xerogels samples using two different copper sources:

Cu(NO3)2·2.5H2O and copper particles chemical synthesized. The samples were studied as a function of annealing

temperature. It is found that the by heat treatment and the appropriate copper precursor we can produce particles of

metallic Cu, cuprous and cupric oxide. The obtained IR absorption results allow studying the interaction of the metalbased

species and the oxide support.

Article

Sol-gel X rays CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA FÍSICA OTRAS ESPECIALIDADES FÍSICAS OTRAS

A strategy to measure the dark energy equation of state using the H 🇮

🇮

galaxy Hubble function and X-ray active galactic nuclei clustering: preliminary results

Manolis Plionis ROBERTO GIOVANNI TERLEVICH AFONSO Elena Kirilovsky Terlevich RICARDO CHAVEZ MURILLO (2011)

We explore the possibility of setting stringent constraints to the dark energy equation of state using alternative cosmic tracers like (a) the Hubble relation using H 🇮🇮 galaxies, which can be observed at much higher redshifts (z ≲ 3.5) than those currently traced by Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) samples, and (b) the large-scale structure using the clustering of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), which have a redshift distribution peaking at z ∼ 1. In this paper we use extensive Monte Carlo simulations to define the optimal strategy for the recovery of the dark energy equation of state using the high-redshift (z≳ 2) Hubble relation, but accounting also for the effects of gravitational lensing, which for such high redshifts can significantly affect the derived cosmological constraints.We investigate the size of the simple of high-z H 🇮🇮 galaxies needed to provide useful constraints in the dark energy equation of state. Based on a ‘figure of merit’ analysis, we provide estimates for the number of 2≲ z ≲ 3.5 tracers needed to reduce the cosmological solution space, presently provided by the Constitution SNIa set, by a desired factor. The analysis is given for any level of rms distance modulus uncertainty and we find that an expected reduction (i.e. by ∼20–40 per cent) of the current level of H 🇮🇮-galaxy-based distance modulus uncertainty does not provide a significant improvement in the derived cosmological constraints. It is much more efficient to increase the number of tracers than to reduce their individual uncertainties. Finally, we propose a framework to put constraints on the dark energy equation of state by using the joint likelihood of the X-ray AGN clustering and of the Hubble relation cosmological analyses. A preliminary joint analysis using the X-ray AGN clustering of the 2XMM survey and the Hubble relation of the Constitution SNIa set provide Ωₘ =0.31±0.01 and ω=−1.06 ± 0.05.We also find that the joint SNIa–2XMM analysis provides significantly more stringent cosmological constraints, increasing the figure of merit by a factor of ∼2, with respect to that of the joint SNIa–baryonic acoustic oscillation analysis.

Article

Galaxies: active Galaxies: starburst Cosmological parameters Dark energy Large-scale structure of Universe X-rays: galaxies CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Clustering, Bias and the Accretion Mode of X-ray selected AGN

Manolis Plionis (2012)

We present the spatial clustering properties of 1466 X-ray selected AGN compiled from the Chandra CDF-N, CDF-S, eCDF-S, COSMOS and AEGIS fields in the 0.5−8 keV band. The X-ray sources span the redshift interval 0 < z < 3 and have a median value of ⁻z = 0.976. We employ the projected two-point correlation function to infer the spatial clustering and find a clustering length of r₀ = 7.2 ± 0.6h⁻¹ Mpc and a slope of γ = 1.48 ± 0.12, which corresponds to a bias of b(⁻z ) = 2.26±0.16. Using two different halo bias models, we consistently estimate an average dark-matter host halo mass of Mₕ ≃ 1.3(±0.3) × 10¹³h⁻¹Mꙩ. The Xray AGN bias and the corresponding dark-matter host halo mass, are significantly higher tan the corresponding values of optically selected AGN (at the same redshifts). The redshift evolution of the X-ray selected AGN bias indicates, in agreement with other recent studies, that a unique dark-matter halo mass does not fit well the bias at all the different redshifts probed. Furthermore, we investigate if there is a dependence of the clustering strength on X-ray luminosity. To this end we consider only 650 sources around z ∼ 1 and we apply a procedure to disentangle the dependence of clustering on redshift. We find indications for a positive dependence of the clustering length on X-ray luminosity, in the sense that the more luminous sources have a larger clustering length and hence a higher dark-matter halo mass. In detail we find for an average luminosity difference of δlog₁₀ Lₓ ≃ 1 a halo mass difference of a factor of ∼3. These findings appear to be consistent with a galaxy-formation model where the gas accreted onto the supermassive black hole in intermediate luminosity AGN comes mostly from the hot-halo atmosphere around the host galaxy.

Article

Galaxies: active : clustering X-rays: galaxies CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Luminous x-ray agn in clusters of galaxies

Manolis Plionis (2010)

We present a study of X-ray AGN overdensities in 16 Abell clusters, within the redshift range 0.073 < z < 0.279, in order to investigate the effect of the hot inter-cluster environment on the triggering of the AGN phenomenon. The X-ray AGN overdensities, with respect to the field expectations, were estimated for sources with Lₓ≥ 10⁴² erg s⁻¹ (at the redshift of the clusters) and within an area of 1 h⁻¹₇₂ Mpc radius (excluding the core). To investigate the presence or not of a true enhancement of luminous X-ray AGN in the cluster area, we also derived the corresponding optical galaxy overdensities, using a suitable range of 𝑟-band magnitudes. We always find the latter to be significantly higher (and only in two cases roughly equal) with respect to the corresponding X-ray overdensities. Over the whole cluster sample, the mean X-ray point-source overdensity is a factor of ~ 4 less than that corresponding to bright optical galaxies, a difference which is significant at a > 0.995 level, as indicated by an appropriate t-student test. We conclude that the triggering of luminous X-ray AGN in rich clusters is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, searching for optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) counterparts of all the X-ray sources, associated with our clusters, we found that about half appear to be background QSOs, while others are background and foreground AGN or stars. The true overdensity of X-ray point sources, associated to the clusters, is therefore even smaller than what our statistical approach revealed.

Article

Galaxies: active Galaxies: clusters: general X-rays: galaxies X-rays: galaxies: clusters X-rays: general CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Unveiling the nature of INTEGRAL objects through optical spectroscopy🟉

. VIII. Identification of 44 newly detected hard X–ray sources

VAHRAM CHAVUSHYAN (2010)

Hard X–ray surveys performed by the INTEGRAL satellite have discovered a conspicuous fraction (up to 30%) of unidentified objects among the detected sources. Here we continue our program of identification of these objects by (i) selecting probable optical candidates by means of positional cross-correlation of the INTEGRAL detections with soft X–ray, radio, and/or optical archives and (ii) performing optical spectroscopy on them. As a result, we pinpointed and identified, or more accurately characterized, 44 definite or likely counterparts of INTEGRAL sources. Among them, 32 are active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 18 with broad emission lines, 13 with narrow emission lines only, and one X–ray bright, optically normal galaxy) with redshift 0.019 < z < 0.6058, 6 cataclysmic variables (CVs), 5 high-mass X–ray binaries (2 of which in the Small Magellanic Cloud), and 1 low-mass X–ray binary. This was achieved by using 7 telescopes of various sizes and archival data from two online spectroscopic surveys. The main physical parameters of these hard X–ray sources were also determined using the multiwavelength information available in the literature. In general, AGNs are the most abundant population among hard X–ray objects, and our results confirm the tendency of finding AGNs more frequently than any other type of hard X–ray emitting object among unidentified INTEGRAL sources when optical spectroscopy is used as an identification tool. Moreover, the deeper sensitivity of the more recent INTEGRAL surveys enables one to begin detecting hard X–ray emission above 20 keV from sources such as LINER-type AGNs and non-magnetic CVs.

Article

Galaxies: Seyfert Quasars: emission lines X–rays: binaries Stars: novae, cataclysmic variables Techniques: spectroscopic X–rays: individuals CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

On the X-ray emission from massive star clusters and their evolving superbubbles – II. Detailed analytics and observational effects

GUILLERMO TENORIO TAGLE SERGIY SILICH (2009)

In this work, we present a comprehensive X-ray picture of the interaction between a super star cluster and the interstellar medium. In order to do that, we compare and combine the X-ray emission from the superwind driven by the cluster with the emission from the windblown bubble. Detailed analytical models for the hydrodynamics and X-ray luminosity of fast polytropic superwinds are presented. The superwind X-ray luminosity models are an extension of the results obtained in Paper I. Here, the superwind polytropic character allows us to parametrize a wide variety of effects, for instance, radiative cooling. Additionally, X-ray properties that are valid for all bubble models taking thermal evaporation into account are derived. The final X-ray picture is obtained by calculating analytically the expected surface brightness and weighted temperature of each component. All of our X-ray models have an explicit dependence on metallicity and admit general emissivities as functions of the hydrodynamical variables. We consider a realistic X-ray emissivity that separates the contributions from hydrogen and metals. The paper ends with a comparison of the models with observational data.

Article

Hydrodynamics Stars: winds, outflows ISM: bubbles X-rays: ISM. CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA

Accurate classification of 29 objects detected in the 39 month Palermo Swift/BAT hard X-ray catalogue ⋆, ⋆ ⋆

Vahram Chavushyan (2012)

Through an optical campaign performed at four telescopes located in the northern and the southern hemispheres, plus archival data from two on-line sky surveys, we obtained optical spectroscopy for 29 counterparts of unclassified or poorly studied hard X-ray emitting objects detected with Swift /Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and listed in the 39 month Palermo catalogue. All these objects also have observations taken with Swift /X-ray Telescope (XRT) or XMM-European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) which not only allow us to pinpoint their optical counterpart, but also study their X-ray spectral properties (column density, power law photon index, and F₂₋₁₀ keV flux). We find that 28 sources in our sample are active galactic nuclei (AGNs); 7 are classified as type 1, while 21 are of type 2; the remaining object is a Galactic cataclysmic variable. Among our type 1 AGNs, we find 5 objects of intermediate Seyfert type (1.2−1.9) and one narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy; for 4 out of 7 sources, we are able to estimate the central black hole mass. Three of the type 2 AGNs of our sample display optical features typical of low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER) and one is a likely Compton thick AGN. All galaxies classified in this work are relatively nearby objects since their redshifts lie in the range 0.008−0.075; the only Galactic object found lies at an estimated distance of 90 pc. We also investigate the optical versus X-ray emission ratio of the galaxies of our sample to test the AGN unified model. For these galaxies, we also compare the X-ray absorption (caused by gas) with the optical reddening (caused by dust): we find that for most of our sources, specifically those of type 1.9−2.0 the former is higher than the latter confirming early results of Maiolino and collaborators; this is possibly due to the properties of dust in the circumnuclear obscuring torus of the AGN.

Article

Atomic data X-rays: galaxies X-rays: binaries Novae, cataclysmic variables CIENCIAS FÍSICO MATEMÁTICAS Y CIENCIAS DE LA TIERRA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA ASTRONOMÍA Y ASTROFÍSICA